Here’s why we all need a Beth Pearson in our lives

I just got finished watching the 16th episode of This Is Us. I purposely missed the day it initially aired because I prefer to watch really good shows with little to no commercials.

Episode 16 named ‘Memphis’, opens up with Randall’s wife, Beth, going to bat for him after he had another anxiety attack. Randall is an extremely smart and successful stock and options trader (I think!) at a financial firm.The pressure of handling new and old accounts, having his biological (terminally ill) father come back into his life while maintaining the natural order of his life and home, the pressure has got to him yet again.

Susan Kelechi Watson’s plays Beth Pearson and I over love her character. My mom doesn’t, but I do. She thinks she’s a little stubborn. lol To me, Beth represents all of the strong women who doesn’t take no sh*t from no one – not even her mother in law.

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For so long society has painted women like her as difficult and tough to deal with. Because “wifey” has to have a la, la, la attitude, be aesthetically perfect and willing to perform any and every sexual act you prefer with the hopes you’ll stick around or never think of touching another woman. Because men will be men, right? *insert the emotionless emoji here

If you’re really watching, This Is Us reveals time and time again why Beth’s immovable force of an attitude serves a HUGE purpose. Not only to Randall but to everyone.

Although we all need a friend like Beth Pearson in our corner, I’m really speaking to the men on this one. So fellas, here’s why you should want someone like Beth Pearson as a wife.

(Be warned. If you haven’t watched a lick of this show, some of what I’m saying will probably fly over your head considering that fact that I will be sharing play-by-play examples to support this specific post.)

Alright, here goes!

  • You’re protected, even when you fail to protect yourself

When Randall brought his biological father to his home, Beth didn’t waste any time to figure out if William, Randall’s father, was taking advantage of her husband. She didn’t beat around the bush either. She’s a straight shooter. No bird’s getting by her!When you have the world on your shoulders, you not going to need a partner who’ll fold when you do.

When you have the world on your shoulders, you not going to need a partner who’ll fold when you do.

  • She’ll raise some amazing women

This is a no brainer. We all know that little girls reflect their mother and little boys (when older) will seek to find a woman who reflects his mother.

While Randall deals with the gravity of his father dying, Beth understands that she doesn’t have to only be strong for her husband, but she has to get her daughters through this pivotal moment too.

When you don’t get it right, she will.

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  • She’s Balanced

Although a bit abrasive (without emasculation) in order to protect Randall, Beth is also clearly funny, soft, and extremely supportive. The counsel that gives Randall is astonishingly jarring in the most intimate way. It’s sweet, sound, and aggressive – when necessary. It’s interesting to watch Randall consistently approach his wife in the most vulnerable and child-like way. Randall’s character defies the male stereotype, for sure.

(It’s interesting and very touching to watch Randall consistently approach his wife in the most vulnerable and child-like way. Randall’s character defies the male stereotype, for sure.)

Appreciate a woman who can pretty much do it all. Her power should not intimidate you but empower and excite you.

I’m writing this because I want every woman who does not budge at b*tchness and who is unapologetic at being the bad guy for the protection of their own, to be proud. Know that you are the foundation of any and every empire ever built.

Never allow yourself to accept the negative stigma given by society because your way of caring doesn’t fit the societal standards of what a woman, wife, and mother should be.

Without hesitation, continue raising hell for those you love.

Xoxo.

 

“Tried to domesticate ya.” #BlurredLines

“I wouldn’t date her, she doesn’t even know how to bake a cake.”

So I’m here cutting out the pieces for the fabric that’ll make up the dress that I’m making, and the word domesticated sprung into my mind.

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You see, guys or people in general, would look at me and categorize me as the typical business woman who doesn’t cook or do anything other than work towards her business and/or ambition. One who’s statistically likely to not get married, but live life wealthy, just as a single mother looking for the right one at age 40. Hmm..

This is what y’all believe.

I been told before that I am Taraji P Henson’s character off of the movie Think Like A Man. I’ve heard it all, trust me. But, that’s besides the point–I’m just trying to paint a picture here.

I’ve learned more and more how the baby boomers’ generation (yes that’s where things 1st took a left turn, believe it or not), my generation, and the one now, carry out general living – via the system (the norm), all WRONG.

Let’s go back to the word domesticated. Domesticated is universally known as, home care (to “tame”). In rap songs, it’s solely referred to a woman who cooks.

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In today’s day and age, we take everything regarding popular culture via the media, as fact. Facts that becomes beliefs, and then morals, and then it’s universally stereotyped the minute people begin acting upon those said morals a.k.a. beliefs.

So here’s the 411.

Being domesticated is not only traditional home care, and just a woman who can cook. Domestication is a TRADE. You know the thing they USE TO teach EVERYBODY in middle school? Or maybe not if you’re under the age of the age of 40 or so.

Of course gender related trades were taught to girls, and others to boys.

Everyone was learning something, in regards to maintaining a home, but both genders weren’t referenced to being domesticated. Only women. 

Take a moment to stop and check, challenge rather, your beliefs. Because most people will probably read this and say, yea she’s not the norm. And maybe in a sense I ‘m not, because the mass majority has adopted the modern stereotype, but do not categorized every women who is business orientated as one who is solely knee-deep into her ambition and/or career.

So I guess, maybe they’re right. My life will not be the normal, traditional, “honey I’m home,” household. It’ll be balanced, and it’ll work for me and my husband to be.

I get to the end if this to realize that it sounds feminist-ish! lol I promise you, this is NOT a feminist post, but I just HATE stereotypes. Plus I’m a woman and I’m just sharing my thoughts and experiences. I don’t like to be branded in any way unless it’s related to who I am, the actions in which I practice and integrate in my daily life. All integrity.

Well..below is the picture I posted on Facebook and Instagram of the fabric I’ll be using to make the Lacrimosa – dress. 🙂

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IG: @_2sharemyworld

Michelle Obama forgoes a headscarf and sparks a backlash in Saudi Arabia???

I wanted to share a thread/discussion that I had with a couple of colleagues of mine on today’s headline:

Michelle Obama forgoes a headscarf and sparks a backlash in Saudi Arabia.

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama participate in a delegation receiving line with new Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz, fith left, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The president and first lady have come to expresses their condolences on the death of the late Saudi Arabian king Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama participate in a delegation receiving line with new Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz, fith left, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The president and first lady have come to expresses their condolences on the death of the late Saudi Arabian king Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

***For privacy purposes, I’ve changed the names of the people commenting, besides my own.

Johnny: It seems a little disrespectful.
1 hr · Like · 1

Sammy: Her hair was just done 💁💁 poverty and starving children in America >> a head piece
1 hr · Like

Whitney: I agree it was Johnny.
1 hr · Like · 1

Whitney: Sammy! lol that is not an excuse for her not abiding by their cultural headpiece. Especially since it’s a sign of respect to wear one.
1 hr · Like · 1

Sarah Lee (ME): After reading the article, honestly, I wouldn’t have worn one either. I think she was making a statement. Although its culturally respectful to wear one, she was saying something much more by not wearing one – not only the laws against women but also about the fella who passed. To marry interracial-ly in our country years ago was disrespectful, but it never made it right. I think for Suadi, it’s time for a change, friend(s).

The president should’ve said, Michelle maybe you should sit this trip out. Lol She’s too raw and thorough for that. As the article that I read said, she gave no f$cks, and neither would I.
1 hr · Like

Johnny: Sarah, it wasn’t about any one person. It’s a religious and cultural tradition. She understand she did it to show the strength of a woman to defy any norms she wanted but it was provocative and in my personal opinion unbecoming of the first lady’s office. And Sammy you’re right sometimes these articles can be distractions from more pressing problems.
53 mins · Like

Sarah Lee (ME): Because its religious or cultural, still doesn’t make it right. But, that’s just my opinion. Religion and religious culture are two different things. All that is required is modesty. She was all of modest. I’ve sat on both sides of the fence with both tradition and religion, and I am among the many few legendary (rebellious) voices we all remember and know well – past and present.

So, I understand your argument in the traditional and conservative sense, however nothing changes, enhances, or progresses solely that way. #Routine

Because times must and always do change, Johnny.

Maysoon Zayid @maysoonzayid
Twitter-Follow
Here’s video: https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=976644092378011&set=vb.179609608748134&type=2&theater … I love @MichelleObama head held high. Show them what equality looks like! #FLOTUS #Saudi
11:25 AM – 27 Jan 2015

Here’s the link to the UPROAR on Twitter. smh https://twitter.com/Riyadh_K_S_A/status/560126646166900736/photo/1


Sarah Lee via Facebook
1 hr ·
Marilyn said it best, well-behaved women seldomly make history.
By societal cultural condition, women and girls are to be quiet and follow the rules. Always be modest and walk the line. ‪#‎tightrope‬
Women, period, dance at the muse of marketing, money, and men. The 3 M’s that “we” MUST follow suit.
I don’t want to make this seem ultra feminist, but the sprinkle of women who step outta line, redefine the lines of morality, and stand toe to toe with men, are the women to watch.
They hold things down, build, and repeat. ‪#‎fruitful‬ Putting the RIGHT woman in charge will create a ripple effect like no other.
Re-condition your minds of what a radical, out spoken and passionate woman is. Lastly, understand the amount courage it takes, to say something out of a pool of silent women.

“Saudi Arabia has a strict dress code for women, who are instructed to wear black robes and head coverings at all times in public, though visitors to the country are not required to abide by the dress code. In 2011, when then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met with Abdullah in New York, she did not cover her face or hair. Nor did then-first lady Laura Bush during a 2006 visit with Abdullah in Saudi Arabia.

Some on Twitter noted that Obama had covered her hair during a visit to a mosque in Indonesia and wondered why she hadn’t done the same, Egypt’s Ahram Online noted, while one woman urged fellow Saudis not to “make Obama angry at us.”
The first lady’s office had no comment on her attire.”

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2015/01/michelle-obama-saudi-arabia-head-covering-criticism-114646.html#ixzz3Q8C2k47n